HistoryWalks                               around Redditch
Arrow Valley Walks The Arrow Valley dates back 12,000 years but has had a major influence on the development of Redditch right up to present times.
Redditch Walks is part of my Explore Redditch group of websites                Designed, maintained and administered by Anthony Green

The Arrow Valley

The Arrow Valley was created during the last (Devensian) ice age around 12,000 years ago and flint tools have been found here indicating that there were people here in the late Neolithic period onwards. Running along the eastern periphery of the Park is the route of Iknield Street, a Roman road, and Ipsley, which lies between the central and southern sections of the park, was mentioned in the Domesday Book. In the 12th Century, Cistercian monks arrived in the northern section of what now is the Arrow Valley Park, diverted the River Arrow, drained the area and built Bordesley Abbey. The monastery lasted for 400 years before the dissolution and the abbey precinct then reverted to rough farmland. The area has never been ploughed or built on and is a valuable archaeologic site. It is a scheduled monument under the Ancient Monuments and Archaeological Areas Act 1979 and was extensively excavated by Reading University in the 1960s and 70s. The Bordesley Abbey Visitor Centre lies within the Forge Mill Museum complex. The introduction of needle manufacture in the Redditch area relied heavily on the water power provided by the River Arrow, particularly for the final scouring (cleaning) process. Along the Arrow within Redditch there were numerous water mills of which evidence of five of them still survives within the area. The most important of these is the National Needle Museum at Forge Mill which was opened by Queen Elizabeth II in 1983. This is of international importance and is the only working water powered scouring mill in the world. The final chapter in the history of the Arrow Valley was the designation of Redditch as a ‘New Town’ in 1964. For the development of Redditch planners had learnt from previous mistakes and the development followed the ideals of the Garden City movement of the early 20th Century. Thus, the Arrow Valley Park was created, with its attractive lake, which provided a ‘green corridor’ passing through the town.

Arrow Valley Walks

There are three walks for the Arrow Valley Park. These are currently being updated with a new format for 2018. However, in order to re-launch the Redditch Walks website, the walks listed are from 2010. Arrow Valley Walk    Bordesley Abbey to Papermill Arrow Valley Walk  Arrow Valley Lake to Papermill Arrow Valley Walk  Arrow Valley Lake to Washford
HistoryWalks around Redditch
Arrow Valley Walks The Arrow Valley dates back 12,000 years but has had a major influence on the development of Redditch right up to present times.
Redditch Walks is part of my Explore Redditch group of websites                Designed, maintained and administered by Anthony Green

The Arrow Valley

The Arrow Valley was created during the last (Devensian) ice age around 12,000 years ago and flint tools have been found here indicating that there were people here in the late Neolithic period onwards. Running along the eastern periphery of the Park is the route of Iknield Street, a Roman road, and Ipsley, which lies between the central and southern sections of the park, was mentioned in the Domesday Book. In the 12th Century, Cistercian monks arrived in the northern section of what now is the Arrow Valley Park, diverted the River Arrow, drained the area and built Bordesley Abbey. The monastery lasted for 400 years before the dissolution and the abbey precinct then reverted to rough farmland. The area has never been ploughed or built on and is a valuable archaeologic site. It is a scheduled monument under the Ancient Monuments and Archaeological Areas Act 1979 and was extensively excavated by Reading University in the 1960s and 70s. The Bordesley Abbey Visitor Centre lies within the Forge Mill Museum complex. The introduction of needle manufacture in the Redditch area relied heavily on the water power provided by the River Arrow, particularly for the final scouring (cleaning) process. Along the Arrow within Redditch there were numerous water mills of which evidence of five of them still survives within the area. The most important of these is the National Needle Museum at Forge Mill which was opened by Queen Elizabeth II in 1983. This is of international importance and is the only working water powered scouring mill in the world. The final chapter in the history of the Arrow Valley was the designation of Redditch as a ‘New Town’ in 1964. For the development of Redditch planners had learnt from previous mistakes and the development followed the ideals of the Garden City movement of the early 20th Century. Thus, the Arrow Valley Park was created, with its attractive lake, which provided a ‘green corridor’ passing through the town.

Arrow Valley Walks

There are three walks for the Arrow Valley Park. These are currently being updated with a new format for 2018. However, in order to re-launch the Redditch Walks website, the walks listed are from 2010. Arrow Valley Walk    Bordesley Abbey to Papermill Arrow Valley Walk  Arrow Valley Lake to Papermill Arrow Valley Walk  Arrow Valley Lake to Washford